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Corrie Fee, The Cairngorms

On the southern edge of the Cairngorm National Park is Corrie FeeScotland’s most dramatic glacial valley.

To get here head to the southern edge of the Cairngorn National Park to the breathtaking Glen Clova, and then park at the Glen Doll Ranger Centre. Take the forest path beside the White Water.

As you climb to the head of the valley, the mountains, including the crags of Craig Rennet, close in on all sides, dwarfing you by their sheer scale.

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The forest path winds along the Fee Burn, getting ever closer to the huge wall of the corrie where a waterfall pours over the cliff. Swollen with snowmelt, this quiet, remote landscape is filled with roaring, tumbling noise – you can truly see why corrie in Gaelic also means ‘cauldron’.

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Corrie Fee was formed by a glacier driving the softer rock ahead of it down the valley, forming the huge cliffs, loosening huge slabs of rocks and leaving behind heather covered ‘moraines’. Corrie Fee is a designated National Nature Reserve and in summer, the enclosure of the glen means the glen is filled with alpine plants, willows and rare flowers.

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Climb up the side of the waterfall for a truly incredible view back down the glen.

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From the waterfall, you can return back to the car park, or for those with more energy (and the right walking gear) the steep path eventually reaches the Cairngorm plateau where you can climb to the summits of Mayar and Driesh, a pair of Munros.

The Cairngorm Plateau is the UK’s largest area of high mountains and the views stretch for miles – in winter watch out for Mountain Hares.

You might also like...  Ben Lomond & the Ptarmigan Ridge

Cairngorms

Driesh

Can you spot the tiny people climbing the ridge of Driesh?

We climbed both Driesh and Mayar – out 11th and 12th Munros!

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You might spot that on this trip I’m using a pair of Antishock Walking Poles c/o Leki. I find climbing down hills an issue – especially on my hips and knees. They are also rather good for scrambling, checking for bogs and ice and generally pointing at things! ou will spot people walking with poles everywhere on the Munros, for good reason – they are a lifesaver.

It is not often that I am left truly, truly speechless – Corrie Fee, my photos just can’t your landscape the justice it really deserves.

Click for full pano!

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Love, from Scotland x

Visit Corrie Fee NNR

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